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How I came to writing

Like most authors, I've been fascinated by books since an early age. Because my parents were working (yes, I had a very modern mummy, ...

Friday, February 17, 2017

Promo for The Haversham Legacy

Just came across this:

The Haversham Legacy by Nickie Fleming

Excerpt Heat Level: 1

Book Heat Level: 1

Buy at: www.roguephoenixpress.com
Buy at Amazon


The sudden marriage of the Marquis of Haversham ignites a series of events. The marquis is murdered, his wife and daughter suffer an accident. The marchioness is dead, but where is baby Justine?
Young Nigel Denby is the only one who can name the culprit of these murders. However, he has to flee the country on the accusation of high treason. He swears revenge on the man who arranged this.
When he meets an highwayman and his daughter, a plan is formed and at last he returns to England, to trick the murderer into confession.
Little does he know that his mysterious companions have secrets of their own…


October, 1668

A woman approached the group of courtiers around the King. She looked very young and very innocent compared to most of the other women present. Her delicate pink gown made her stand out even more.

Charles the Second smiled pleasantly when he saw her and beckoned, "Ah, there you are, my dear! James, may I present Lady Claire De Vere, eldest daughter of the Earl of St. Albans."

The man he addressed made a courtly bow.

"Lady Claire, this is one of my best friends, the Marquis of Haversham."

A bit further away, a young man watched the scene. His name was George Templeton and he was the cousin of the marquis. He was not dancing, as one would expect of such a young and dashing young lad. With his fair hair, blue eyes, and his sportsman’s body, he was the dream of every girl and her mother--even more so because he was the sole heir of the Marquis of Haversham. The marquis was already thirty-eight years old and had never married.

James faced the girl--and it was plain to George how this pleased the older man. Of course the lady was pretty, with her black hair, blue eyes, and cherry-like mouth. She could be his daughter though, and most certainly she was too innocent for his cousin’s taste. Although James had never looked for a wife, he did not object to taking the occasional damsel to his bed. He once told his cousin that he preferred experienced women who knew how to please a man and did not make demands.

Yet right now he seemed to be drowning in the eyes of this girl who could only have sixteen or seventeen years of age. She said something and he laughed at it. Then he offered her his arm and they moved to the dancing floor.

George began to feel a bit unsure at that exact moment. It was as if the center of his universe suddenly shifted out of focus. He had built his life on the certainty of becoming the next Marquis. He could not--would not--allow something to happen to his dreams of becoming a rich and wealthy man.

The Haversham Legacy is a beautiful blend of the lavish and the picaresque, combining courtly life with swashbuckling adventure.
Mindy McKay for Rogue's Angels

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Another great review!

The book is just available, and already a second (positive) review was posted on Amazon! I've copied and pasted here underneath:

Nickie Fleming’s crisp and colorful words thrust the reader back into a time where horse drawn coaches were the mode of transportation and women’s dresses dragged on the ground. The author’s words give you a real sense of being there. I enjoyed the pace of the book. The book moves effortlessly through the well-defined plot. The book creates an immediate interest in the main character. From the first page the author quickly draws you into the tumultuous life of the young blonde hair woman Maggie. Maggie is a woman who possesses a quiet determination that gives her the strength she needs to defy her beginnings. From the moment you meet Maggie you want to see her make it. Neil Pickering, the man whose life becomes unexpectedly intertwined with Maggie’s, is a unique character. He is as intellectually strong and determined as he is handsome. Whenever Pickering is present his personality commands the scene. His need to understand medicine matches her need to survive. I enjoyed the gritty murders that take place in the book. The murders have a dark undertone, which left me eager to finish each page and discover who has such a thirst for death. The Black Coach plot offers its readers mystery, hope, intrigue, and a quiet love story. It is an immediate for anyone passionate about reading.

If anyone else has read the story yet, please don't hesitate to post your own review on either Amazon or Barnes&Noble. You know, the more reviews, the better a book sells.

Sunday, February 5, 2017

Positive review for The Black Coach

There is already a review posted on Amazon - and it's very positive! This is what is written by D.A. Cairns:

A troubled young woman flees an abusive situation and is rescued by a mysterious man. Another man is searching for her, and a series of murders links all three in this intriguing, and suspenseful romance.
The Black Coach was engaging from the beginning. I immediately fell for Maggie and wanted a happy ending for her. I was curious about her rescuer’s activities and behavior, and also wondered how the murders were connected to her, even though it was obvious they most certainly were. Lots of questions and doubts were raised in my mind as I read, especially with Fleming’s deft foreshadowing. Nice slow burn on the sexual tension between the lead characters who were very believable. Very neatly plotted, it is a pacey and compelling story which I can recommend to readers of mystery/romance.

I read the whole novella length book in one sitting because I enjoyed it a lot. I suspect you will too.

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Excerpt from The Black Coach

For those interested, here's a teaser...

 It didn't take long before Maggie was fast asleep once again. When Martha noted her drooping head, she put a cushion behind it, to make the girl more comfortable and lastly spread a plaid over her, lest she should catch a cold.

She studied the girl for a while. Cleaned up, she already looked a lot better than the previous day. She had better talk to the master. The girl's speech was remarkable fine for a working-class child. She felt sure there was something of a mystery involved here. Perhaps thinking about this would lighten Neil's mood. He'd been mourning Lady Suzanne long enough to her liking.

Around noon her son walked into the kitchen for his lunch. He looked up when he saw the sleeping girl.

"Is she fit to come down already?" he wanted to know.

"She's not completely better," Martha told him, "but she ate all of her breakfast, and as you can see she's sleeping again. No better healer then rest, I say."

"The master asked me how she was," Amos said. "I'm glad I can tell him she's doing fine."

"Did he need you to fetch something?" Martha wanted to know. They both knew to what she was referring.

"I brought in the usual. I don't mind, though," her son acknowledged.

She nodded. "We have a good master in his lordship. No matter what other people may think, he's a decent human and I'm proud to be serving him."

"So am I," Amos agreed.

He sat down at the kitchen table and immediately began to eat when his mother put a full plate before him.

"I thought you'd like some stew," Martha said. "There is enough meat in it to give you stamina for the next trip."

No need for more words. Mother and son understood each other perfectly.

~ * ~

Later that afternoon, in Pickering village, the men of the region gathered in the local pub after ending their work on the fields and farms. The talk was lively and the beer flowed freely.

John Barry put down his pint, wiped his mouth with his sleeve and remarked to his mate Ben, "Saw that black coach again yesterday, when I went to check on the sheep."

Ben hardly looked up. "Aye, I'm listening."

"Wonder whose property it is and what its business is. Always appears when darkness falls."

Ben took another gulp of his pint. Then he acknowledged what John mentioned. "My brother's son, Tim, saw it too. He said it rode so fast, as if chased by the devil."

"Yeah, it was speeding for sure. Could not see who or what was in it."

"Not the first time it's been seen on our road. Something strange going on, I think."

Joshua Thistlewaite, the landlord, heard the comments but didn't comment on them. He just poured the drinks like a good landlord. Besides, he couldn't well afford to spend time talking to his customers. The pub was full, as always around this time. His sharp eyes surveyed everything to be sure he could intervene at a timely fashion.

All the men and lads he knew from around, except for the one stranger. He'd never seen the man before. The man entered about half an hour ago and ordered a light ale in a polite way. Now he was seated in the farthest corner of the pub, sipping his pint.

While enjoying a calmer moment behind the tap, Joshua studied the stranger more closely. He looked to be in his forties, had a stern face and lips which seldom laughed. A lawyer or a banker in all probability, he thought.

What bothered him a little was that the man appeared to be listening in on the conversation of Ben and John, although he couldn't fathom why such ordinary talk would interest a man of his quality.

Disturbing his thoughts, the stranger beckoned him.

"What can I do for you, sir?" he asked, hurrying over to his table and trying not to show he had been studying him.

"First, fetch me another pint of this excellent lager and then, if you can spare the time, I'd like to talk to you for a while."

It was said in a cultivated tongue, and Joshua could immediately tell the stranger didn't originate from this part of the country. London or some other southern town, he guessed.

He hurried to carry out the order, while asking Ben to step behind the bar for the time he was occupied elsewhere. He returned to the table.

"I am now at your disposal, sir."

He saw how the stranger glanced shortly at Ben, who was already tapping another pint for John.

"Do you get a lot of people in here?" he then wanted to know.

"It depends," Joshua replied. "On weekdays it can get busy when all the men need to water their throats."

"You must know quite well what goes on in the village," the stranger continued.

Joshua shrugged. He carefully weighed his words, not wanting to reveal too much. His instinct told him something was not right here.

"Not much goes on in Pickering I don't know about."

The gent nodded. "I thought so. Well, I am trying to locate a young woman by the name of Margaret Thompson. She would be eighteen years of age and has blonde hair. Do you know if any such girl lives in or passed by your village?"

Joshua was silent for a moment. The request confirmed his ill feelings. He understood he would have to be very sparse in answering, to make sure he didn't cause harm to anyone or anything.

"Why do you need to know?" he asked, but in such a way the other would not be insulted.

The man smiled. To all appearances, he looked innocent and seemed trustworthy. Joshua knew better. He felt an underlying coldness and sensed some feeling of threat.

"She's come into an inheritance and the trustees have asked me to find out her whereabouts," the man answered, while smiling again, and producing a gold coin out of one of his pockets.

Joshua eyed the coin and reconsidered. It could be true. He knew there existed men who were employed to search for people who were lost or had disappeared. After all, the stranger had done nothing wrong yet.

Let me hear what you think!